Tag Archives: New Zealand Identity

In memoriam: The ties that ‘bind’

A Brief Reflection When it comes to ANZAC Day I’m always in a bind. The deaths, the maimings and the huge disruptions to ordinary people’s lives should never be forgotten; but to ‘honour’ that suffering in ways that, ultimately, may help … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Freedom, Military, National Identity, New Zealand Politics | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

False flag logic – Part II: ‘Out, damned Jack!’

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Lady MacBeth in ‘MacBeth’ (Act 5, Scene 1) – William Shakespeare One of the main arguments put forward in favour of a flag change for New … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Media, Military, National Identity, New Zealand Politics, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

Pointless referenda I would like

Well, the flag’s well and truly come down for the start of the silly season so let’s get into the spirit of it all. Yes, time to put aside all that serious politico stuff that ‘lefties’ get so uptight about. As … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, National Identity, New Zealand Politics, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

PMs just wanna have fun …

According to John Key it was all just innocent “horsing around“. It wasn’t, of course – as John Armstrong in the New Zealand Herald understands. And Key knew that too. All his protests to the contrary amount to him pulling our collective … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Human Nature, National Identity, New Zealand Politics, Political Polls, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , | 17 Comments

‘What they see is what they get’

“Part of it is, I think, is, I suspect … I’m a pretty laid back, sort of down-to-earth hopefully approachable guy, and, … and, I think kind of again, what they see is what they get and they like that … Continue reading

Posted in New Zealand Politics, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , | 20 Comments

Flagging interest in ‘folly’ of vexillology

John Key seems like an unlikely vexillologist – or should that be vexillographer?. That aside, what was John Key ‘flagging’ when he proposed a referendum on New Zealand’s national flag to coincide with this year’s election – without having already … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, National Identity, New Zealand Politics, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Key’s approach won’t work “over time”

It is often said that those who “Live by the sword, die by the sword“. It might also be said that those politicians who, less excitingly, live by portraying themselves as ‘pragmatic’ and ‘non-ideological’ will, in the fullness of time, … Continue reading

Posted in National Identity, New Zealand Politics, Political Psychology | Tagged , , , , | 14 Comments

Water, Waitangi, ownership and power

There’s a reason why we talk about property rights. Owning property without having any rights to it makes as much sense as having rights to something without owning it in some way. ‘Water rights’ and ‘water ownership’ are, in all … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Economics, Free Market, Freedom, Maori, National Identity, New Zealand Politics | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A lesson about community

Who would have thought that, in the saga that is the ‘recovery’ of Christchurch, it would be the Anglican Church that would give us the clearest example of the emptiness of modern expressions of ‘community’? When push came to shove … Continue reading

Posted in Earthquakes, Economics, Free Market, Human Wellbeing, National Identity, New Zealand Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

What ground is ‘left’ when it comes to land, assets – and nationalism?

It’s the issue that won’t go away [and here], so it’s probably a good time to ask “Where should the left stand on the land (and ‘our’ assets)?” “Stand in the place where you live” – so sang REM in what … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Freedom, Human Nature, Human Wellbeing, National Identity, New Zealand Politics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment